Chopsticks Cliff- Right-hand Section

(16 routes)

Is a continuation of the Left-hand Section, with a more southerly aspect, so it has better shelter from the easterly and more shade, but of course dries slowly. This cliff was badly damaged in the earthquakes. Two routes are completely gone, and several others are badly affected.

The easiest approach is by traversing around from the cliffs to the south, following a rough track - initially the Wok Face, and then the Soupbowl (better climbing is found on the Wok Face, the first cliff passed). Alternatively, if you can find the benched track you can follow that and then strike up the hill to the crag, or even take a direct line after crossing the fence.

Routes are described left to right, though the easier approach is from the right. The left part of this cliff has scrub with a rough track through, though there is a better track connecting further around to the Left-hand Section of cliff.

Note that some routes have probably not had second ascents, nor been climbed since the earthquakes. Most routes would benefit from better cleaning.

Although not a great crag, this is notable for having probably the hardest trad route on Banks Peninsula.

Altitude: 
600m
Type: 
Wall
Aspect: 
South West
Walk time: 
One hour plus
Reference Title Grade Length Quality Bolts Gone Natural pro Link to edit content
Long Johns 20
0
wire representing trad
"Up the rightangled corner with kinked crack low down and tree below arete at 2/3rds height. Up to tree and R into corner and roof crack." This route was badly damaged in the earthquakes and looks very dangerous.
Pieces of Eight 20
0
wire representing trad
"As for LJ to the tree, then up and L to leaning hand crack. Up this, move R to finish up awkward corner." As with Long Johns, this is badly damaged and looks very dangerous..
Alan Hill, 1999.
Finger Licking Good 18
0
wire representing trad
"Start 5m to the R, on buttress edge. Into low alcove, L and up bulge with crack (crux). Past shrub and trend RW up corner with capping blocks." This climb seems to start where the tōtara is pressed against the rock. However there seems to be no viable continuation above the tree at half-height.
Hamish Reid, Alan Hill & Phil Green 1999
Gritstone Crack 20
0
1 wire representing trad
This climb was totally destroyed in the earthquakes.
Alan Hill, 1999.
Cornflake 16
0
wire representing trad
Start 15m to the R, around the toe of the buttress, next to tree. Up groove with flake, step R onto ledge, then up & L to finish up vegetated groove.
Paul Bingham & Alan Hill 2000
Hatchet Crack 25
2.01
wire representing trad
To the R is a face with obvious widening crack.. Climb the crack and final bulge.
Richard Kimberley & Alan Hill 2002
Chopsticks 14 25m
0
wire representing trad
The obvious vegetated corner on the right side of the wall, though the trees, finishing up a wide crack.
Henry Mares 1977
Paper Tiger 17 25m
2.01
wire representing trad
This route includes the obvious left-ward cracks in the centre of the buttress. Start up the right of the two cracks past the trees. Move out left below overhang with horizontal crack, to the vertical cracks and then layback the flak (crux). Surmount the block above and bridge from the wall of the gully back to the slab on the right; climb this to the ledge. Use the wide crack beside the breakout and scramble carefully over earthquake-shattered rock to the top.
Alan Hill, 2001
Compensation Crack 17 25m
0
wire representing trad
Start as for Paper Tiger, but continue up on the right side of the buttress. Follow a series of hand cracks and ledges through newly-exposed rock on the breakout scars.
Lindsay Main, 2020.
Consolation Crack 18
0
1 wire representing trad
This climb started up a vegetated off-width crack, but the upper part completely collapsed, leaving behind very loose-looking rubble and a lawyer-filled starting crack.
Richard Kimberley, 2002
Chindit 20 20m
0
wire representing trad
A few metres right, just around the arete is a right-facing corner, with an overhanging crack above. The corner is gradually cleaning up, but is still quite dirty.
Alan Hill, 2002
Sward In The Stone 15 15m
0
wire representing trad
Just to the right is a vegetated groove, then a small buttress. This route climbs the left side of the buttress. Starting in the scrub climb the flake with surprising difficulty (shoes tend to slip ion grass) and twin crack, stepping right at the grass-filled crack on to the slab; then up on the ledge to gain a hand crack; and easily to the top.
Alan Hill, 2002
No More Gaps 13 12m
0
wire representing trad
The vegetated corner 3m R, exiting R over bulge. Steep but straightforward finish.
Alan Hill, 2002
First Route 14
0
wire representing trad
4m R is a short coner capped by OH. Finish RWs.
Peter Gresham & Alan Hill 2002
Short Sharp Shock 19
0
To the R is a fence and large block. The next route starts below this. Climb the OHing corner crack past fuchia, move R and over roof. Short but good moves.
Alan Hill and Peter Gresham 2002
Unamed
0
From the top of the block scramble down and R to OHing scoop and belay. Traverse R, then up groove.
Peter Gresham & John Shrewsbury 2002
Attribution: 
Original descriptions are by Alan Hill, edited and updated by Lindsay Main.
UUID: 
d7255e40-cfe5-4c44-9f76-39251d644dba