Pohutukawa cliff

(18 routes)

Left of the prominent cave (there will be some awesome routes out of this some day) is
Pohutukawa cliff, the cliff with the obvious cracklines. This cliff attracted most attention
initially, and has the greatest density of routes.

Type: 
Wall
Aspect: 
North East
Reference Title Grade Length Quality Bolts Gone Natural pro Link to edit content
Toad in the hole 17 15m
0
wire representing trad
On the outside wall of the chimney/cave. Boulder up the roof to start, then follow the groove past the hole to the top. Abseil down the chimney while on belay.
Jo Haines, Dave Campbell 17/4/1992.
Santa's surprise 16
0
wire representing trad
Further around the coast is a prominent pinnacle jutting out into the sea, nicknamed Elephant rock. There are a few nice lines on this pinnacle however the rock is a bit dangerous. The crack on the seaward end was attempted by Dave, but he prudently backed off. At times there is sand at low tide around the end of Elephant rock, at other times you may have to jump across rock pools. The next sandy beach has a great deal of rock, however the quality appears to be poor.
Dave Barker, Ken Morison 2/1/1992.
Boulderers licence -4 7m
0
The next little cove has a prominent slab just left of a small cave. BP refers to boulder problem: Face and crack just left of Scramble.
Dave Bailey 22/2/1992
Scramble -4 7m
0
Up ripples and pocks on the arete left of the chimney.
Dave Bailey 22/2/1992.
Opposing forces -4 7m
0
The chimney.
Dave Bailey 22/2/1992.
Burlesque 17 12m
0
wire representing trad
A little grubby, but a nice crack climb with a definite crux. Traverse left to the small bush to finish, or carry on up to a sturdy Pohutukawa.
Jo Haines, Dave Campbell 17/4/1992.
Groovy crabs 17 20m
0
wire representing trad
On the seaward end of Pohutukawa cliff are some grooves and cracks. The first route at Te Ananui, this takes the left-most groove. Crux moves through the bulge, finishing up a dirt bank (careful).
Jo Haines, Dave Campbell 5/10/1991.
Sneeches on beaches 15 25m
0
wire representing trad
Stepped arete left of chimney/offwidth at the end of Pohutukawa cliff. Exit left at the top (sandy) and up to scrub.
Dave Campbell, Jo Haines 5/1/1991.
Dreadrock holiday 21 20m
0
wire representing trad
Thin crack above the groove two metres left of Antymatter. Runout at the top on shitty rock. Needs a bolt belay.
Mark Jones, Ray Hollingsworth 1/1992.
Antymatter 18 20m
1.02
wire representing trad
flake. Belay off Pohutukawa roots, beware of the ant nest.
Mark Jones, Ray Hollingsworth 1/1992.
Rapture of the steep 19 20m
0
wire representing trad
The thin crack two metres left of Thidwicks flake. Climb to the level of the Pohutukawa and traverse into it to belay. RP's useful.
Mark Jones, Ray Hollingsworth 8/1/1992.
Thidwick's flake 17 15m
2.01
wire representing trad
Corner crack system, with the flake in the lower corner. Finish at the tree. A choice line on good rock.
Ken Morison, Mandy Armstrong 13/10/1991.
Solitary vice 19 18m
1.02
wire representing trad
The open corner on the left side of the arete. Sound rock and nice bridging moves.
Dave Campbell, Jo Haines 29/2/1992.
Rhyolite rhapsody 16 18m
2.01
wire representing trad
Past the arete left of Ken takes a tumble is a steep face with cracklines which juts out towards the sea (shown on the cover photo). The prominent central corner crack system with the large tree in the top corner is Thidwick's flake. Three metres right of Thidwick's flake is a small roof at 2-3 m height, with an arete above. Up the flake and through the small roof to the pedestal, then up the steep corner crack on the right side of the arete to finish at the tree. Nice!
Dave Campbell, Jo Haines 5/10/1991.
Ken takes a tumble 16 18m
1.02
wire representing trad
Corner crack on the buttress one metre left of Flying in a blue dream. Step right to tree at the top of Flying in a blue dream. Nice.
Dave Barker, Ken Morison 2/1/1992.
Flying in a blue dream 16 18m
2.01
wire representing trad
A lovely climb and a good introduction to Te Ananui. Corner crack system, clamber past the small tree to the large Pohutukawa for belay and abseil.
Jo Haines, Dave Campbell 5/10/1991.
Sweet Melisa 15 18m
1.02
wire representing trad
Direct start to Demolition crack, takes the thin crack 1m left.
Ray Hollingsworth, Cath Fitzpatrick and Astrid Clapcott 2/1992.
Demolition crack 16 18m
1.02
wire representing trad
Overhanging pod and crack to start (crux), then overlapping hand crack, step left below dead stump into the base of the prominent crack splitting the face, exit right to ramp and up to belay tree. Named for the huge block pulled off on the second ascent.
Dave Campbell, Jo Haines 5/10/1991.
UUID: 
0555dedc-7738-45e6-97bb-2b98f7253b09