Long Side, Left Hand Side (CLOSED)

(36 routes)

CLOSED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE - see access notes.

Left Hand End. From Casual Regression to Wild Gravity Direct.
Most routes are about 15 to 20 metres in height. The Long Side comes into its own for climb-ers competent at around grade 18 and above.

Type: 
Wall
Aspect: 
North
Access: 

CLOSED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. NZAC Auckland section is working with the school to reach a solution. Please DO NOT CLIMB OR BOULDER at the long side.

Reference Title Grade Length Quality Bolts Gone Natural pro Edit link
Casual Regression 15
0
wire representing trad
The rather shabby crack line.
John Smith, May 1995
False Induction 16
0
2bolts wire representing trad
Climb past a bolt on the lower tier to another bolt on the lichenous slab. A ½ or 1 cam is useful under the top flake.
John Smith, May 1995
CS Cliff Smith’s Corner 16
0
wire representing trad
The left-facing corner to easier ground above. An easier variant finishes right to the Bop Gun ledge.
BG Bop Gun 24
0
The steep highball rib with a committing move to the ledge.
Charlie Creese (solo), February 1981
BD Brain Damage 20
0
wire representing trad
A short right-facing crack and corner. Crux at top.
Len Gillman, 1977
Df Dekcuf 24
0
wire representing trad
The steep, sheer groove.
Bryce Martin, September 1977
TR The Raven 24
2.01
wire representing trad
The steep, left-leaning groove. Though short, this is often regarded as a yardstick for the grade.
Robbie McBirney, 1977
Deffust 18
1.02
wire representing trad
Easy climbing to reach the jugs, and a point of no return!
Robbie McBirney, July 1974
Desolation Angel 24
0
wire representing trad
The thin overhanging crack through the buttress is strenuous and demanding to protect.
Bryce Martin, 1977
Direct Finish 26
0
1bolts
Finish straight up, still more strenuously.
David Nepia, 1994
Morning Glory Eliminate 25
0
wire representing trad
The steep, thin groove. Morning Glory was the first route ever climbed at the Long Side, but the school demolished half of it leaving only this thin shallow groove.
Tony Ward-Holmes, April 1986
Hear No Evil 25
0
2bolts
A LH variant finish — once you’ve done all the hard stuff on Morning Glory.
Alex Palman, 1989
Moral Dilemma 18
0
wire representing trad
An awkward mantle leads to the ledge and groove (which is the top of the original Morning Glory).
Alex Palman, April 1985
Playing Chicken 18
0
wire representing trad
Describes a wide bow up the cliff from left to right and back again. Reach the ledge of Moral Dilemma either direct or from the start of Morning Glory Eliminate. Move right onto the next ledge then angle back left, into the ramp leading to the final groove of Moral Dilemma.
Geoff Bates, 1985
Tears For Fears 19
0
wire representing trad
Take the groove between Moral Dilemma and the start of Shitbox Klingons. Continue up the arête above. Peter Dickson (solo), 1985
Peter Dickson (solo), 1985
Shitbox Klingons 20
0
1bolts wire representing trad
These two routes are described as originally climbed, but it is better to combine the bot-tom of one with the top of the other:
Bryan Moore, 1985
Kamikaze Krack 20
0
1bolts wire representing trad
Climb the groove right of Shitbox Klingons, continue past the old fixed ring piton, and finish up the wide crack above.
Peter Dickson, 1985
Yuppie Floosie 26
0
1bolts wire representing trad
A frustratingly tantalising prospect. Climb the blunt rib and continue directly above, right at the old ring piton to the ledges and final cracks of Kamikaze Krack or Shitbox Klingons.
Tony Ward-Holmes, 1987
Supergroove 26
3
1bolts wire representing trad
A New Zealand classic and a defining moment for climbing in New Zealand. This fierce groove overhangs like a sausage, making the base of the route the driest place at the crag on a wet day. A boulder-problem start leads into the relentless groove. On a first attempt McBirney fell at the crux and ended in hospital. He then placed a piton (now a bolt). Twenty years later (the story goes), he re-enacted the ascent for dozens of onlookers and fell again just before the bolt with a bone-jarring thud. Unhurt, he dusted himself off and completed the climb next try.
Robbie McBirney, November 1976
Perennial Pipedreams 26
2.01
1bolts wire representing trad
Scene of some puffy post-ascent hands. Climb the overhanging groove past the luxury-length bolt at half height and up the finger crack above.
Rick McGregor, January 1983
Blam, Blam, Blam 28
1.02
wire representing trad
Tip-tearing moves lead leftward up the overhanging wall to reach a peapod groove and an easing but still difficult finish. (Only 27 if boulder mats, the bolt on Faulty Logic or pre-placed gear is used.) There were few routes harder than this in the world in 1981: at Arapiles, Cobwebs was climbed in December and the first French 8as not until 1982.
Charlie Creese, November 1981
Faulty Logic 27
0
2bolts
The worst joke at the crag? The wall with 2 bolts, straight up past the big hole.
Kim Carrigan, February 1986
Effort, Money and Time 24
0
wire representing trad
Dubbed by one wag ‘Biggles Flies Further West’. Start at the pointy ledge and climb the thin crack left of Biggles Flies West. Clip the bolt on Faulty Logic if you can.
Bolke Water, February 1992
Biggles Flies West 21
0
wire representing trad
Harder than it looks. Follow the thin crack and do a ‘Bigglesworth’ to reach the ledge.
Grant Davidson, November 1980
Graveyard Groove 17
1.02
wire representing trad
Moore climbed this sharp corner just hours after the column that formerly enclosed it collapsed — as he was soloing it!
Bryan Moore, June 1984
Biggles Sucks a Kumara 22
0
2bolts wire representing trad
Climb the buttress past one peg and a bolt.
Peter Dickson, August 1984
Dalrymple’s Groove 18
0
wire representing trad
Dalrymple is in fact Rick McGregor’s middle name. The prominent V-groove, somewhat difficult to protect.
Robbie McBirney, 1973
LH Finish 17
0
wire representing trad
Climb left to finish up Graveyard Groove.
Diddely Dick 23
0
2bolts
The rib provides variety.
Rick McGregor, 1981
Koruba 17
0
3bolts wire representing trad
The prominent U-shaped groove. This bridging classic used to see some long falls — bolts now rather dampen the excitement.
Rick McGregor, 1974q
Nutless 18
0
2bolts
The arête between Koruba and Nutcracker. Don’t use the cracks on either side.
Peter Dickson (solo), 1985
Nutcracker 16
0
wire representing trad
Traverse up and right to the ledge at the bottom of the groove (or reach it direct — harder). Climb the groove, exiting right.
Robbie McBirney, May 1973
Thunderpussy 25
0
2bolts wire representing trad
Up the arête to the break, then tackle the upper buttress.
Peter Dickson, 1988
Green Groove 21
1.02
wire representing trad 1
McBirney was ‘just bouldering’ until he decided reversing back down was too difficult! Good moves in the V-groove lead to the blast hole, then move across into the groove proper. Good protection can be arranged in the crack of the eliminate.
Robbie McBirney (solo), September 1974
Wild Gravity 24
0
3bolts
Start up Sneakeasy but move left at the second bolt and finish direct up the buttress.
Alex Palman, August 1987
WGD Wild Gravity Direct 26
0
Stay left of the rib all the way.
Troy Stevenson, March 1996