Place info

Mt Hooker

(4 routes)

Mt Hooker is a superb massif flanked on three sides by extensive glaciers. An impressively steep north face dominates the view from the upper Otoko River. Hooker is readily visible from the Haast and West Coast highways, and provides a powerful attraction for climbers who want to experience climbing west of the Main Divide. From the west, rapid approach can be made up the Otoko Valley to reach the junction with Jack Creek, or further on the Upper Otoko Pass. Access can also be gained from the east by crossing the Landsborough River and Solution Range or from the south by traveling up the Landsborough and Clarke Valleys. Climbing parties require a minimum of one and a half days to reach Mt Hooker from the west or south.

  • 2640m

    Altitude

Type: 
Mountain
Altitude: 
2640m

Mt Hooker is a superb massif flanked on three sides by extensive glaciers. An impressively steep north face dominates the view from the upper Otoko River. Hooker is readily visible from the Haast and West Coast highways, and provides a powerful attraction for climbers who want to experience climbing west of the Main Divide. From the west, rapid approach can be made up the Otoko Valley to reach the junction with Jack Creek, or further on the Upper Otoko Pass. Access can also be gained from the east by crossing the Landsborough River and Solution Range or from the south by traveling up the Landsborough and Clarke Valleys. Climbing parties require a minimum of one and a half days to reach Mt Hooker from the west or south.

NZMS260: 
G37 425 033
Topo50: 
BY14 325 417
Reference Name Grade Quality Length Comments Actions
0
 

Formerly provided reasonable access to the mountain, but recent windfall is reported to have created havoc in the forested section of the creek making it near impassable. Beyond the end of the stream, cross the Jack Glacier to connect with a broad ridge which leads up to the west peak of Mt Hooker. Ascent to the higher eastern peak is accomplished by traversing across the east slope and up a snow chute.

Samuel Turner, Cyril Turner, December 1928

4
0
 

Several parties attempted to climb the mountain from the Lower Otoko Pass before it was completed in 1962. Note that early accounts describe this as the North East Ridge! A broad shelf leads across the east face until crevasses force the route up onto the summit pyramid. A large gendarme at about 2500m which deterred several parties is turned on the Clarke side to reach the east peak. A difficult pinnacled ridge leading to the summit requires down climbing on tension at a couple of points to reach the final sharp cheval ridge. Plenty of exposure!

Now I had a decision problem. I hated to give up, but there seemed no way out. The way down was difficult enough and we could not afford any more mishaps. The others however did not follow up my overtures of defeat, but seemed still hopeful that we could pull something out of the box. They sent up my jersey for I was feeling cold in the shade (or was it fright), and I considered the problem some more. Through the window I could see that there was not any prospect on the Otoko side, while the only way on my side was vertically down. So that way it would have to be. Perhaps on the sloping shelves of rubble below me, we could find a way around underneath the pinnacle.

Paul Bieleski, New Zealand Alpine Journal, 1962.

Paul Bieleski, G.A.Carr, Bruce Jenkinson, A.G.Nelson, January 1962

3+
0
 

A route leads from the Hooker Glacier directly to the high peak. Follow mixed ground up the spur to reach loose schist and move carefully to the summit snowfield.

Dave Innes, Bruce Robertson, Peter Foster, Laurie Kennedy, January 1968

2+
0
 

The southern snowslopes from Marks Flat and Murdock Creek provides rapid access to the upper slopes. Climb around the western summit at about 2450m, sidle across the north slope snowfield to an arête leading to the higher eastern peak. A lengthy one day climb requiring over 1700m of height gain.

Marion Scott, Dora de Beer, Joe Fleurty, Chris Pope, April 1937

This place appears in: 
100 Peaks
Barron Saddle – Mt Brewster: a guide for climbers
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