Place info

Mt Adams

(1 route)

Mt Adams has been climbed from the Seige Glacier via the ridge at the head, but the peak does not appear to have been directly approached from either the Seige or Escape glaciers. There is no record of the SE ridge being climbed.
W Wilson, surveyor, record in survey office.

  • 2208m

    Altitude

Type: 
Mountain
Altitude: 
2208m

Mt Adams has been climbed from the Seige Glacier via the ridge at the head, but the peak does not appear to have been directly approached from either the Seige or Escape glaciers. There is no record of the SE ridge being climbed.
W Wilson, surveyor, record in survey office.

NZMS260: 
I35 093 681
Topo50: 
BW17 993 065
Reference Name Grade Quality Length Comments Actions
1+
0
  From SH6 follow the stopbank road on the true right of Little Man River (Dry Creek) for about 15mins, moving over to the gravel riverbed before there is too much scrub to bash through. Follow the riverbed up, watching for cairned shortcuts. A couple of crossings are necessary to avoid a bluff on the true right just above the first major side creek. Fortunately, a small gravel lead on the true left from about I34 040706 gives good travel upvalley for several hundred metres past it. Cross back and continue, sometimes in side channels, on the true right to major forks at the second side creek, 2.5 hours from the road, I35 049697. Camping is possible here. At these forks, the main (true left) stream heads into a gorge. Less than 100m up the open bed of the true right branch, pick up cairns and markers on the true left where the track up the spur begins. DoC has just recut this track (2009). Carry water from here, as there is no reliable water source higher up. Follow this to the tops, where there is possible to camp. Occasionally there is a smidgeon of water in a tiny tarn near the bushline, 3 hours from the forks. Regard the rest of the ridge as waterless except for higher snow patches. Tussock leads up the spur to gravel or snow and rock outcrops on the range at pt 2194m. From here either traverse the ridge, or more usually, follow a mix of crevassed snowslopes and rock scrambling to gain the summit of the higher outlier.
Attribution: 
Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club
This place appears in: 
The Canterbury Westland Alps: a climbing and transalpine guide
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