Place info

Mt Strauchon

(3 routes)

Mt Strauchon is one of the key mountains in the Southern Alps as it drains to three major rivers: the Landsborough (to the Haast), the Huxley (to the Waitaki) and the Hunter (to the Clutha). The true summit is an outlier 150m northwest of the main divide. The first ascent party was reported to have climbed to within 8 feet of the summit, but in 1992 a modest Harry Stevenson suggested it was 8 feet and about 50 metres!

  • 2391m

    Altitude

Type: 
Mountain
Altitude: 
2391m

Mt Strauchon is one of the key mountains in the Southern Alps as it drains to three major rivers: the Landsborough (to the Haast), the Huxley (to the Waitaki) and the Hunter (to the Clutha). The true summit is an outlier 150m northwest of the main divide. The first ascent party was reported to have climbed to within 8 feet of the summit, but in 1992 a modest Harry Stevenson suggested it was 8 feet and about 50 metres!

NZMS260: 
G37 449 887
Topo50: 
BY14 349 271
Reference Name Grade Quality Length Comments Actions
3-
0
 

Mt Strauchon is most frequently climbed by gaining height along the Main Divide from Brodrick Pass until rocky bluffs force climbers onto the south east slopes. Alternative acess is across the McKenzie Creek face then upwards on solid rock and snow filled gully to reach a point 150m east of summit. The route joins 4.15 and requires a delicate traverse across the final 150m of ridge to the high point.

Bill Beaven, Norman Hardie, Jim McFarlane, 1947

3-
0
 

From Brodrick Hut cross the alpine meadows to reach the lower snowslopes. A route on the southern edge of the glacier leads upwards near the south ridge to reach the crest and the traverse to the high point. Conditions on the traverse can vary from a rather loose and narrow rocky ridge, to a pencil-thin icy arête. Take gear appropriate for the expected conditions.

Jim Gilkison, Scott Gilkison, GrahamMcGlymont, Harry Stevenson October 1934

2+
0
 

From the East Branch of the Hunter River climb to the saddle west of Mt Strauchon then gain height along the Divide to the summit.

Graham Riley, S.Unwin, J.D.Willis, December 1934

This place appears in: 
Barron Saddle – Mt Brewster: a guide for climbers
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