Place info

Evan's Pass

(38 routes)

Located above the old Lyttelton dump, this cliff was largely ignored apart from one route by Lindsay Main in the late 1980's. A surge of development in 1995-6 has resulted in over twenty routes including several excellent lines, and scope for several more.

A bit of subsequent development has been done, mainly by John Entwisle.

Being south facing, it gets virtually no direct sunlight, making it an ideal place to hide on hot nor-west days. It is also surprisingly well sheltered from the north-easterly, but is exposed to the southerly. The orientation makes it somewhat lichenous but it is surprisingly clean and dry.

Grazing animals (particularly rabbits) have stripped most of the native vegetation in the area except what they can't reach. The result is an area with little other than grass and broom but with a good collection of native plants on the cliff itself including ferns, shrubs, and extensive clumps of orchids. Care has been taken to avoid damaging these plants and if you are cleaning new routes, please respect this approach. There are also numerous skinks and geckos around the top of the cliff - please consider their habitat requirements when moving rocks.

Routes are up to 22m in length, on steep rock of a type similar to that at Lyttelton Rock and tend to be sustained and strenuous. With a few exceptions, most of the routes are partly or totally bolt protected, ie. some routes require other gear as well, but watch out for crumbly rock. There have been some campaigns to rebolt a lot of the climbs to modern standard, but there are a few climbs that require trad climbing skills.

This crag still has a few areas of loose rock- climb accordingly.

Descriptions are from left to right.

The road (left hand) end is generally less steep, with more vegetation, looser rock and fewer clear lines. The centre of the crag has the best rock and most obvious lines. A bit right of the cave the rock is a bit rotten, but then improves again. Many of the routes need further ascents to confirm the grades.

  • South

    Aspect

  • 10min

    Walk in

  • 250m

    Altitude

Type: 
Crag
Aspect: 
South
Altitude: 
250m

Located above the old Lyttelton dump, this cliff was largely ignored apart from one route by Lindsay Main in the late 1980's. A surge of development in 1995-6 has resulted in over twenty routes including several excellent lines, and scope for several more.

A bit of subsequent development has been done, mainly by John Entwisle.

Being south facing, it gets virtually no direct sunlight, making it an ideal place to hide on hot nor-west days. It is also surprisingly well sheltered from the north-easterly, but is exposed to the southerly. The orientation makes it somewhat lichenous but it is surprisingly clean and dry.

Grazing animals (particularly rabbits) have stripped most of the native vegetation in the area except what they can't reach. The result is an area with little other than grass and broom but with a good collection of native plants on the cliff itself including ferns, shrubs, and extensive clumps of orchids. Care has been taken to avoid damaging these plants and if you are cleaning new routes, please respect this approach. There are also numerous skinks and geckos around the top of the cliff - please consider their habitat requirements when moving rocks.

Routes are up to 22m in length, on steep rock of a type similar to that at Lyttelton Rock and tend to be sustained and strenuous. With a few exceptions, most of the routes are partly or totally bolt protected, ie. some routes require other gear as well, but watch out for crumbly rock. There have been some campaigns to rebolt a lot of the climbs to modern standard, but there are a few climbs that require trad climbing skills.

This crag still has a few areas of loose rock- climb accordingly.

Descriptions are from left to right.

The road (left hand) end is generally less steep, with more vegetation, looser rock and fewer clear lines. The centre of the crag has the best rock and most obvious lines. A bit right of the cave the rock is a bit rotten, but then improves again. Many of the routes need further ascents to confirm the grades.

Access: 

To get there, turn towards Godley Head at Evan's Pass and park just by the first cattle stop. Cross the fence somewhere above the road and follow one of the tracks on the Sumner side of the ridge (there is a bench track of unknown origin) for about 200m. The cliff line becomes obvious just to the right of the plateau on the ridge. Cross the fence on the right and traverse around the base of the cliff, or follow the fenceline to get to the top.

Walk time: 
10min
NZMS260: 
M36 900349
Topo50: 
BX24 800 733
Reference Name Grade Quality Length Comments Actions
19
0
4m
  At the left-most end is a short wAn interesting problem up the crack in the middle of the wall. Pro only when its too late (soloed). Phil Stuart-Jones '96
15
0
5m
  The questionably shaped, partly offwidth crack to the right side. Pro adequate (soloed)? The questionably shaped, partly offwidth crack to the right side. Pro adequate (soloed)?
21
1.02
22m
4X bolts
Natural gear required
1
  The buttress above has at least two routes (soloed) in the low teens but the rock is a bit loose in places and is largely uncleaned. Pro is sparse. Just right of the first small wall is an area of circular features, then smooth orange rock, then a pinkish wall with a single circular mark. Boulder up the wall (crux) to the first bolt, then easier ground. Go up the overhang to jugs then a ledge with a shrub. Step left of this and tackle the right-leaning overhanging arête above. Four bolts and other pro (if desired).

Phil Stuart-Jones '96

16
0
5X bolts
  New route with 5 bolts and 2 bolt anchor with chains. Climbs groove, rib and slab right of Destamination.

John Entwisle and Jo Straker 2010

CE
20
1.02
20m
4X bolts
  Right of the vegetated and decaying grooves is the first of a sequence of walls with obvious low overlaps which continues around to the main area. At the left hand end of the first 'overlap wall'. Through the overlap then small roof to ledge. Two more bulges await above, each with a bolt (the upper one being shared with the route to the right). Four bolts and belay chain.

Joe Arts '96

22
0
22m
5X bolts
Natural gear required
  Named after Joe's mountain bike, back pedalling seems to be the other common tread. Start below the shallow crack and climb through the bulge. Once past the bulge, climb the wall veering slightly leftwards. Possibly requires a medium size cam??

Joe Arts 2000

GQ
18
0
5X bolts
  Take the line to the left of the mossy gully, shares the 3rd bolt with JS.

John Entwisle

18
0
20m
5X bolts
  Start up steep bulge to a ledge. Finish the last 3rd of UA to get to rap station.

John Entwisle

UA
20
0
20m
4X bolts
  Right on a pair of shallow grooves with a central nose. The name has Roman origins. At the wiggle in the wall is a right-leaning arête. Stay on the wall on the right side of this, then up the steps above.

Joe Arts '96

NA
18
0
10m
3X bolts
  Between the two cracks. Make some use of the right hand crack as you work up the wall on variable holds. Step right at the orchid at the top and join SE. Soloed while cleaning.

Phil Stuart-Jones '96

SE
16
0
10m
3X bolts
  The pink and white wall on the right, left of the Weetbix Wall. Start to the left or right, then up. Soloed while cleaning on a hot nor-west day.

Phil Stuart-Jones '96

RW
19
0
20m
6X bolts
  Use the same start as SE, then move rightwards across the steep black wall, going around the nose for a slab finish.

Joe Arts

BF
23
0
10m
2X bolts
  The left-facing wall above the pillar and alcove which looks like a stack of weetbix has been named The Weetbix Wall. Very original. Right of the alcove is a short, dirty, flaring offwidth which awaits some routebagging masochist. Then there is the next 'overlap wall' which terminates beyond the hedge and tree. Up the flakey bottom wall to the overhang then crank and rock through to better holds. Up the wall above to the rap/belay bolts. Two bolts and other pro.

Joe Arts '96

ES
20
1.02
10m
3X bolts
Natural gear required
  Up the left of the wall behind the hedge and tree. Three bolts with nice Petzl hangers. There are rap/belay chains on the ledge above.

Marcus Thomas '96

18
0
12m
4X bolts
  Straight up the left area of the slab steepening at the top.
MS
20
0
12m
4X bolts
  Climb through the thin start on the right hand edge of the of the slab, finishing off on the featured pillar at the top.

Callum Hudson, 1997

Rg
19
0
12m
4X bolts
  Straight up the right edge of the slab, that gets a bit steeper past the horizontal break. Hardest at the start.

John Entwisle 2010

20
0
5X bolts
  Goes up the left side of the quake scar.

Tony Burnell 2015

TG
24
0
20m
7X bolts
  Through the centre of the double roof, then up the steep wall.

Marcus Thomas, 2004.

BS
22
0
21m
2X bolts
Natural gear required
  Crank through the last and largest overlap in the sequence using the fist crack towards the right hand end. Go up the wall above moving left of the crack as it peters out, then up to the crack system winding down from the top. Exit via the crack in the right-facing top corner. Pro in the top and bottom cracks and two bolts.

Joe Arts, 1996

CR
21
1.02
18m
6X bolts
  First led in heavy mist. Bridge the crumbly groove below the right end of the overlap, then lay-back up onto the wall above. Proceed up and over the bulging wall left of the shallow groove, climb up slab to the ledges, then move slightly rightwards to rap station near the top.

Phil Stuart-Jones, 1995

HT
20
2.01
21m
7X bolts
  Boulder up the wall just left of the corner with the thorny bush, then straight up the wall above exiting between the shallow groove and the fading corner which comes in from the right. Circumvent the scrub at the top by stepping right onto the top of W clipping the bolt as you go.

Phil Stuart-Jones '95

17
0
21m
4X bolts
Natural gear required
  It's a bit loose... Bridge the corner with the thorny bush. Head left up the wall above the ramp then climb the wall/crack. As the crack peters out, go up the vertical crack and tackle the juggy overhang and wall above. Uses the first two bolts and fourth bolt of Hat Trick, some big pro in the main crack, and there's a last bolt on the top wall. Another may be added right of the upper overhang.

Phil Stuart-Jones '95

RP
20
1.02
21m
7X bolts
  Boulder out the direct start (about 22) stick clip the bolt or climb the ramp from the Hat Trick start, via the square hole at 4m or traverse in from the route to either side. The second bolt is at the top of the right-sloping ramp just under the rather loose roof. Move up past the right hand end of the overhang on good grips. Get your breath back on the ledge, then tackle the headwall staying right of the groove, to the rap station at the top of the headwall.

Phil Stuart-Jones '95

DH
19
0
21m
6X bolts
  Up the flaring crack to a rest and the first bolt, then up, left around right-leaning overlap, and up to the big ledge. Head slightly right up the steep headwall then out left to gain the left hand right-facing crack. The other crack goes too. Pro in bottom and top cracks approx30-40mm, if required or small run out on top bolt.

Joe Arts '95

20
1.02
19m
6X bolts
  Obtain a stance on the small rounded ledge in the wall just left of the cave. Reach up to clip the first bolt then up and right to better holds under the roof. The first bolt of CS protects the reach out left for the second bolt. Power left through the overhang then right, up through the top nose, and left up the top ramp. Some of the bolts are shared with Dumping Human Waste, also a wire for the top. The climb turns a few corners so a couple of long quick draws may be useful.

Phil Stuart-Jones '96

CS
23
0
18m
6X bolts
 
At the left hand end of the cave. Carefully bridge the chimney of very sharp rock then swing up the extremely steep eroding crack line (try not to increase the grade) and out through the right-leaning chimney at the top.

Joe Arts '95

Ly
20
0
17m
3X bolts
Natural gear required
 
At the right hand end of the cave. The pro is tricky at the bottom but there is little practical alternative. Clip the first bolt from the ledge (you may need a stick), then swing out around the arête and up to the block and pro placements. Straight up staying right of the top groove for steeper but better rock. Three bolts plus other pro.

Phil Stuart-Jones '95

16
0
15m
5X bolts
  Climb up steep groove, then move rightwards to gain the easier ground, to finish off on the right side of the headwall.
18
0
15m
5X bolts
  Start on the right side of the main wall veering leftwards up a system of slabs to Rap Station.
20
0
18m
5X bolts
 

The following routes are found on the small craggy outcrops to the right of the main wall.

10m R of lottery. Climb up shallow chimney, escape right and onto ledge finishing the last few metres on a headwall.

Joe Arts 2004

18
0
18m
4X bolts
Natural gear required
3
  A lot of variance for such a short climb. Starts on big holds, progresses onto a slab with slopey crimps/jugs. Scramble over tiny roof to top out. (single bolt anchor, or traverse right a few meters to a set of ring anchors).

FFA Cam Pawson 2016

16
0
18m
5X bolts
  Right hand end of the main crag. Climb through system of slabs working to the right of the headwall.

Joe Arts 2004

18
0
8m
1X bolts
Natural gear required
  At the far right of the crag, is a small, steep slab with chain anchors on top. The crack on the left of the cleanest part of the wall. One bolt and other pro.

Joe Arts '96

20
1.02
7m
2X bolts
 
The route up the middle of the slab. Two bolts to clip on the way to the chains.

Joe Arts '96

0
 

A boulder problem to the right has been soloed. Up to the big pocket then escape right (about 12) or persevere up and leftish (about 16).

SBM
21
3
18m
6X bolts
Gone
  Right of the hedge is a deep, dark, dirty drain of a chimney which appears to be populated by rabbits, possums, and quite possibly dragons. No-one has claimed an ascent of this yet although bones have been found at the bottom... Right of this on the next 'overlap wall'. Climb to the jug in the middle of the overhang at about 3m, then move up via the pocket to the right. Move back left up the slab. At this point you can either climb straight up through the gentle bulge on rather loose holds, or move up and left to a rest under the obvious roof then an awkward move back right. Either way, proceed straight up the rather loose, steep headwall. Six bolts.

Joe Arts, 1996

GO
17
0
18m
Natural gear required
Gone
  The obvious right-leaning crack line which starts in a left-facing corner. The first route done on the crag and the main unbolted route. A bit dirty and loose, but once you're past the bush, it's fun climbing that just keeps going!

Lindsay Main

Attribution: 
By Lindsay Main Previously hosted on a website by John Davis Copied on by Grant Piper
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