Place info

Breeze Bay

(25 routes)

There has been a lot of rockfall in the area above the Crater Rim track above the crag, after the 13 June 2011 earthquake. Many large boulders are balanced precariously here and could be dislodged by weather or further aftershocks. Visiting this area is therefore not recommended.

Several crags are above this bay between Farm Park Crag and Godley Head. Only three have been climbed on so far (November 96) but there is potential for further development.

Development started in Spring 1996, with the first routes being done on 19 October by Lindsay Main and Phil Stuart-Jones at the western-most crag.

The rock tends to be a peculiar cross between The Tors, Lyttelton Rock, and everything in between with sweeping smooth slabs, textured walls, and flakey, loose, overhanging cracks. Something for everyone. Unfortunately, the crags tend to have large areas covered in the white lichen we all love to hate – slippery under most conditions, lethal when wet. There is a solution. When the lichen is wet, it comes off fairly well and before the rock gets polished. Unfortunately this means cleaning routes is easiest in the rain!

The crags dry fast and the eastern ones are not only protected from easterly winds but catch the afternoon sun! Top belays are from natural bollards and/or belay bolts.

Crags and routes are described from left to right (west to east).

  • South

    Aspect

Type: 
Crag
Aspect: 
South

There has been a lot of rockfall in the area above the Crater Rim track above the crag, after the 13 June 2011 earthquake. Many large boulders are balanced precariously here and could be dislodged by weather or further aftershocks. Visiting this area is therefore not recommended.

Several crags are above this bay between Farm Park Crag and Godley Head. Only three have been climbed on so far (November 96) but there is potential for further development.

Development started in Spring 1996, with the first routes being done on 19 October by Lindsay Main and Phil Stuart-Jones at the western-most crag.

The rock tends to be a peculiar cross between The Tors, Lyttelton Rock, and everything in between with sweeping smooth slabs, textured walls, and flakey, loose, overhanging cracks. Something for everyone. Unfortunately, the crags tend to have large areas covered in the white lichen we all love to hate – slippery under most conditions, lethal when wet. There is a solution. When the lichen is wet, it comes off fairly well and before the rock gets polished. Unfortunately this means cleaning routes is easiest in the rain!

The crags dry fast and the eastern ones are not only protected from easterly winds but catch the afternoon sun! Top belays are from natural bollards and/or belay bolts.

Crags and routes are described from left to right (west to east).

Access: 

Park your car at the Farm Park car park. Either head east along the walking track until you can go down the gully about 500m along (Breeze Bay West) or around a kilometre for the eastern crags. For the western crags, the alternative is to sidle down and east below and past the first scrappy bluff. There is a pine tree on a ridge east of the western cliff which is a useful landmark.

NZMS260: 
n36 928349
Topo50: 
BX24 828 733
Attribution: 
By Phil Stuart-Jones.
This place appears in: 

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